About Us Primates Environment What Can I Do Primate Pals
       Primates - Non Visitation Policy
 


Pacific Primate Sanctuary Non Visitation Policy

In 1984, when Pacific Primate Sanctuary first began, we encouraged visitors, mostly school children, to allow them to see the faces of animals who were threatened with extinction. We soon  learned that the monkeys had no immunity to common human illnesses.  From our observations and care of the monkeys, we have found that having visitors is not conducive to creating a place of peace, safety, and healing for the animals and, therefore, is contrary to our mission.  

The Non Visitation Policy did not come about as a way to keep the public, including PPS donors, from seeing the animals. It is maintained purely for benefit of the monkeys, many of whom are vulnerable, recovering from trauma and abuse.  Listening to the needs and perspective of the animals means that they are being heard and they are being validated by the Sanctuary. (see “10 Principles of Being Sanctuary”, by the Kerulos Center)

A guiding principle of being a Sanctuary is: “Is it good for the monkeys?”  The volunteers abide by  this minute to minute, hour by hour, day by day, year after year. (In a moment, we know them and they know us, all separation drops away.)  This allows us to see everything through the monkeys’ eyes and from the monkeys’ perspective, then we realize that having visitors is distressing, alarming, and dangerous.  The Sanctuary community has come to understand the importance of not having the primates on exhibit, and the importance of providing a peaceful, safe environment.

We hope all people will resonate with the higher ideal that we are striving to achieve— the evolution from the exploitation of animals and the Earth, to the realization of the Interconnectedness of the World and Compassion for All Beings.   

Miranda on Arrival

Miranda after 5 months at Pacific Primate Sanctuary

Miranda, Cebus capucinus, was emaciated and traumatized when she arrived at
Pacific Primate Sanctuary from a tourist attraction, but with compassion and dedicated care, she was able to heal mentally, physically and emotionally.

 

 

 

Copyright (c) 2003 Pacific Primate Sanctuary, Inc.       Home    Site Map    Legal & Privacy Policy    Web Site Design